Interview With Chanel Dubofsky (Writer & Creator Of The Marriage Project)

Interview With Chanel Dubofsky (Writer & Creator Of The Marriage Project)

When I'm alone, I'm always thinking about the same thing, which is the interior (and other) lives of the characters in the novel I'm writing. It's been this way for my whole life, not with these particular people, who have changed over time, but with imaginary people. It's one of the reasons I like being alone so much, because it's really hard to get a good grip on them when I'm with other people, and I'd almost always rather be with my characters than actual humans. If we're not together for a while, I miss them. I need a tremendous amount of emotional space to write fiction, and if I don't have it, I get very tense and sad and anxious and start acting like a complete garbage bag.

Read More

Guest Post: Sally Deskins On Body Prints, Feminism & Underrepresented Artists

Guest Post: Sally Deskins On Body Prints, Feminism & Underrepresented Artists

The multi-cycles presented me with a reflective new series of work to honor these artists, while also recognizing the cycle of erasure, all the while attempting to remember their contributions. So with my latest series, Mother Artists (Tributes), I created body prints evoking a camouflage color theme including leaf prints, which could reflect several people silenced or lost to history—in art and beyond. Onto the prints, I script quotes from feminist and women artists from past and present about their work, intent or gender issues. I script the quote several times over and over in attempt to remember their names and contributions, to paint over and/or erase it when I’m finished. What is left is an erased effect, with some of the words and their names legible, but not quite. Though the titles hold onto the artist names, most of the text is lost in the image, reminiscent of the cycle of erasure not only potentially for the artist, but for my attempt to recognize them with my art.

Read More

Interview With Kristine Rose (MUA, Esthetician & Writer)

Interview With Kristine Rose (MUA, Esthetician & Writer)

As a service provider, I really just want to help you become your best self. I used to be obsessed with that What Not to Wear show, and there were a lot of great tips on it, but at the end of the episode everyone just sort of looked homogenous and like a very specific version of what style was supposed to be, and I don't so much love that. I think you can make any look work as long as you really commit. I don't just want to mold my clients into my specific vision, I really want to help them find themselves in a way that's authentic. I'm not a huge fan of this whole Kardashian-Instagram make-up trend where everyone's contoured within an inch of their lives and all the eyebrows are done a specific way and the lips are done a specific way. If that's genuinely how you want to look, go for it, but it's not gonna be what's comfortable for most people. I've got to a point now with my make-up where I know what works and I know what I like and it feels like sort of a second skin, so I think that's the goal. 

Read More

Interview With Sarah Nichols (Poet & Author Of She May Be a Saint, Hermeneutic Chaos, December 2016)

Interview With Sarah Nichols (Poet & Author Of She May Be a Saint, Hermeneutic Chaos, December 2016)

This is an almost unbearably sad story. The case remains open sixty-nine years later. She was only twenty-two when she died! Before I started these poems, I wondered what the after-life would be like from her point of view. I imagined her angry at the men who speculated and fantasized about her, I imagined someone who wanted movie stardom, but who got infamy instead. Someone, who, in death, finally became herself. Towards the end of the project, I wrote two poems, "Elizabeth Short Dreams of Blade Runner" and "Elizabeth Short Visits the Black Lodge." Her story is a part of a kind of underground popular history, and I wanted to see her intersect with two things that I love, Blade Runner, which is set in the Los Angeles of 2019, and Twin Peaks, where Dale Cooper dreams of meeting Laura Palmer, who, even though she’s dead when we’re introduced to her, we see her in life, too. How would these women interact in this place which between 1990, when the show first aired, and now, has taken on a huge after-life of its own? Both Blade Runner and Twin Peaks are endlessly quotable; so I used a few lines of dialogue in both. Roy Batty’s line in Blade Runner, "I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe," struck me as particularly apt. As for Twin Peaks, the lines are almost too perfect: "She’s filled with secrets," and "sometimes, my arms bend back." I cited the original sources, but all of the words were also in Ellroy’s text.

Read More